And also a cover idea - just wanted to see what this would look like… (FUN, SLIGHTLY EMBARRASSING FACT: The only reason I remembered that the current Canadian flag was not adopted until the 1960s was because of this old Heritage Minute. :V)

And also a cover idea - just wanted to see what this would look like… (FUN, SLIGHTLY EMBARRASSING FACT: The only reason I remembered that the current Canadian flag was not adopted until the 1960s was because of this old Heritage Minute. :V)

(Source: lookstraightahead)

Woooooosh.

Woooooosh.

(Source: lookstraightahead)

I was making a three-page intro for DSG but I’m not sure I’m going to use it, now. So, here’s a panel from that with a Random Interesting Research Fact:
During the Depression, on the Canadian prairies, many families with cars could no longer afford to run them, and so many were converted into “Bennett Buggies” - cars pulled by horses. Typically the engine was removed so the car weighed less. The name “Bennett Buggy” was in reference to R.B. Bennett, the Canadian Prime Minister from 1930-35. (pictured at right)

I was making a three-page intro for DSG but I’m not sure I’m going to use it, now. So, here’s a panel from that with a Random Interesting Research Fact:

During the Depression, on the Canadian prairies, many families with cars could no longer afford to run them, and so many were converted into “Bennett Buggies” - cars pulled by horses. Typically the engine was removed so the car weighed less. The name “Bennett Buggy” was in reference to R.B. Bennett, the Canadian Prime Minister from 1930-35. (pictured at right)

(Source: lookstraightahead)

sometimes, i like to draw letters

sometimes, i like to draw letters

(Source: lookstraightahead)

Finally, I can stop teasing you and announce…
My Secret Project is a graphic novel adaptation of the novel Dustship Glory by Andreas Schroeder.
This novel is based on a true story, about an incredibly strange guy from Finland named Tom Sukanen, who settled in Saskatchewan during the Depression and built a steamship in the middle of the prairies, hundreds of miles from any ocean.
To this day…no one really knows why. Not to sail back to Finland - a Cunard Line ticket would have gotten him there for $88. And, this being the Depression, when everyone was struggling to keep their farms and grow something - anything - everybody thought he was a nutcase.
…or was he? He genuinely seemed to know what he was doing, and he also built a number of other inventions, including a machine that puffed wheat and a clock powered by falling drops of water (I’m told this clock was, at one time, on display at the Western Development Museum in Moose Jaw - here’s hoping it still is).
The genius of this story is that YOU REALLY ROOT FOR THE GUY, BECAUSE HE WORKS SO DAMN HARD ALL THE TIME…and gets no respect, because the thing he works so damn hard on is a Pointless Passion Project (and he also really lacks social skills). Yeah…I…can sorta relate to that. :v
Anyway, this is a really cool story and is gonna rock your socks. Promise. The plan is to debut DSG #1 at VanCAF, May 24 & 25. May God strike me down if I’m lying.
(Schroeder is OK with all of this, don’t worry - this is why I couldn’t announce it until now)
More info, preview art, etc to come along soon. Stay cool. :v

Finally, I can stop teasing you and announce…

My Secret Project is a graphic novel adaptation of the novel Dustship Glory by Andreas Schroeder.

This novel is based on a true story, about an incredibly strange guy from Finland named Tom Sukanen, who settled in Saskatchewan during the Depression and built a steamship in the middle of the prairies, hundreds of miles from any ocean.

To this day…no one really knows why. Not to sail back to Finland - a Cunard Line ticket would have gotten him there for $88. And, this being the Depression, when everyone was struggling to keep their farms and grow something - anything - everybody thought he was a nutcase.

…or was he? He genuinely seemed to know what he was doing, and he also built a number of other inventions, including a machine that puffed wheat and a clock powered by falling drops of water (I’m told this clock was, at one time, on display at the Western Development Museum in Moose Jaw - here’s hoping it still is).

The genius of this story is that YOU REALLY ROOT FOR THE GUY, BECAUSE HE WORKS SO DAMN HARD ALL THE TIME…and gets no respect, because the thing he works so damn hard on is a Pointless Passion Project (and he also really lacks social skills). Yeah…I…can sorta relate to that. :v

Anyway, this is a really cool story and is gonna rock your socks. Promise. The plan is to debut DSG #1 at VanCAF, May 24 & 25. May God strike me down if I’m lying.

(Schroeder is OK with all of this, don’t worry - this is why I couldn’t announce it until now)

More info, preview art, etc to come along soon. Stay cool. :v

(Source: lookstraightahead)

somedifferentmusic asked: Bought your book last night, love it so far, really great work! Do you have any recommendations for less popular graphic books similar to yours? I love stories like this one, based around things like depression, thoughts, fantasies, etc :)

Thank you so much! :) As far as recommendations go…these two aren’t about depression, per se, but I do think both are extremely underrated (and they both do, sort of, contain fantastical flights of fancy):

Pulpatoon Pilgrimage by Joel Priddy

A story about a robot, a talking bull, and an anthropomorphic thistle going on a journey of self-discovery. (Each character is an outsider of sorts, I’m really drawn to that :p)

Freeway by Mark Kalesniko

A story about an animator with a dog’s head caught in a traffic jam on a California freeway on his way to work. Through all of this there’s also a parallel story about his present working days and struggles in the animation industry (favourite line in the book: “Animation is like sausages. You shouldn’t see how it’s made.”), and another parallel story about what he thinks his life may have been like had he been a Disney animator in 1942 (part of the so-called “Golden Age” of Disney). As much as the story jumps around, it’s never confusing. And holy cow, what lavishly rendered backgrounds - this book reportedly took 10 years to draw…I can see why.

bokor-art asked: Love all your work, such a good style and finish. cat o nine heads is my current favourite :) Also many thanks for your appreciation!

thank you so much, that means a lot as I really love your work as well - keep it up :)

permaqueer asked: hey there! i read look straight ahead as you were posting it years ago. it still remains as one of the most amazing, moving, real, raw, fucking-on-target, intense, art i've read and seen. thank you so, so much for it. i've said thank you like 4 times already but yeah. thank you so much. you have no idea how much it meant to me. means to me still. i have some money now, so i'm hoping i can buy the actual book from you, i've been wanting to do that for a while. endless, really profound thanks.

My pleasure, and thank YOU for reading…man, it’s always so nice to wake up to something like this!! :)

More life drawing from this past Saturday that I somehow forgot to upload.

More life drawing from this past Saturday that I somehow forgot to upload.

(Source: lookstraightahead)

I’ve always wanted to make one of those diamond-patterned book endpapers. So…I made one! That is all.

I’ve always wanted to make one of those diamond-patterned book endpapers. So…I made one! That is all.

(Source: lookstraightahead)